10 facts about dating abuse

Interestingly, the rates of reported victimization versus perpetration in the state were similar for boys and girls.[3] However, when it comes to severe teen dating violence — including sexual and physical assault — girls were disproportionately the victims.[4] At a recent workshop on teen dating violence, co-sponsored by the U. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS), researchers presented findings from several studies that found that girls and boys perpetrate the same frequency of physical aggression in romantic relationships.This finding was at odds with what practitioners attending the workshop said they encounter in their professional experience.Teen dating violence is a major public health concern, with about 1 in 10 teens experiencing physical violence or sexual coercion, and even higher rates of psychological abuse.Some progress toward awareness, prevention, and intervention with these youth has been made.Intimate partner violence (IPV) in adolescents is an important realm of study as, in addition to the usual negative effects of abuse, this violence occurs at a critical period in the social and mental development of a person.

In South Carolina, for example, nearly 8 percent of adolescents reported being physically violent to a romantic partner. Kupper, "Partner Violence among Adolescents in Opposite-Sex Romantic Relationships: Findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health," American Journal of Public Health 91, no. Miller-Johnson, S., Gorman-Smith, D., Sullivan, T., Orpinas, P., Simon, T. Journal fo Clinical Child and Adoelscent Psychology, 38(4), 538 - 550. Unfortunately, we have far to go in raising awareness of this problem; 81% of parents believe that teen dating violence isn’t an issue.Additionally, teens aren’t seeking out the help being offered.

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